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Hannah Wood

Researcher

Hannah Wood
Researcher
Academic degree: Docent
hannah.wood@bioenv.gu.se
+46 31 786 9687
0766-229687

Postal Address: Kristineberg 566, 45178 Fiskebäckskil
Visiting Address: Kristineberg , 45178 Fiskebäckskil


Department of Biological & Environmental Sciences (More Information)
Box 463
405 30 Göteborg
www.bioenv.gu.se
bioenv@bioenv.gu.se

Visiting Address: Medicinaregatan 18 , 405 30 Göteborg

About Hannah Wood

Research Interest

Researcher at the Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences - Kristineberg) and member of the Centre of Marine Evolutionary Biology (CeMEB).

As a marine ecophysiologist and evolutionary biologist my research interests are broad but centralized around the response of organisms to environmental stress and perturbations. My specialism is in multiple stressor experiments: ocean acidification, temperature, salinity and hypoxia. I believe in utilizing and adopting a broad range of methodologies and analyses best suited to a particular organism/question. As such I highly value collaboration and idea exchange.

  • Ecophysiological response to ocean acidification
  • Multiple Environmental Stressors
  • Intraspecific variation and its evolutionary significance

email: Hannah.wood-at-bioenv.gu.se
tel: 031 786 9687


Ecophysiological response to ocean acidification


Ocean acidification (OA) is the term used to describe the changes to the physico-chemical properties of seawater caused by increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. OA acts as an environmental stressor to marine organisms. The oceans have become more acidic as a result of the increased levels of CO2 in the atmosphere as a result of burning fossil fuels. The fast rate of change and extent of the change to the marine environment poses a threat to marine species, biodiversity and the goods and services the oceans provide.

The ways in which a marine organism interacts with the environment is first and foremost at the level of its physiology. Thus understanding the response of a species to OA can be achieved by addressing how this stressor impacts upon the species’ physiology directly on physiological processes (e.g. metabolism, acid-base balance, immune response, calcification, growth). Alternatively it is possible to examine changes expressed at a higher organizational level, e.g. population or ecosystem, which are the indirect consequences of changes to the physiology of the individuals therein. Both experimental approaches are important in predicting possible effects of OA.

Related Publications

  • Wood HL, Spicer JI & Widdicombe S. (2008) Ocean acidification may increase calcification- but at a cost. Proc. Royal Soc. B 275, 1767-1773
  • Wood HL, Spicer JI & Widdicombe S. (2009) Ocean acidification alters macrofaunal mediated nutrient flux across the sediment boundary Biogeosciences 6: 2015-2024
  • Findlay HS*, Wood HL,* Kendall MA, Spicer JI, Twitchett RJ & Widdicombe S (2011) Comparing the impact of high CO2 on calcium carbonate structures in different marine organisms. Mar Biol. Res. 7(6): 565-575 *joint 1st authorship

Multiple Environmental Stressors

Climate change is resulting in warming more acidic oceans, and in addition increased rainfall and climatic shifts will impact marine habitats by altering temperature and salinity, ice coverage and seasonal variability. Each of these environmental stressors has the potential to affect a species distribution and survival.

 

I am interested in the synergies and antagonisms of multiple abiotic stress factors on marine organisms. Does increased temperature exacerbate the physiological effect of ocean acidification, or does it mitigate it to some degree? I run multiple stress experiments with acidification, hypoxia, temperature and salinity.

Related Publications

  • Eklöf JS, Alsterberg C, Havenhand JN Kristina Sundbäck K, Wood HL & Gamfeldt L (2012) Experimental climate change weakens the insurance effect of biodiversity. Ecol. Lett. 15: 864–872
  • Wood HL, Spicer JI Lowe DM & Widdicombe S. (2011) Ocean warming and acidification; implications for the Arctic brittlestar Ophiocten sericeum. Polar Biol. 34(7): 1033-1044, DOI: 10.1007/s00300-011-0963-8
  • Wood HL, Spicer JI Lowe DM & Widdicombe S. (2010) Interaction of ocean acidification and temperature; the high cost of survival in the brittlestar Ophiura ophiura. Mar. Biol. 157: 2001-2013

Intraspecific variation and its evolutionary significance

In the current era increasingly dominated by anthropogenic impacts, it is more important than ever to understand the adaptive potential of species in order to predict, prioritize and where possible mitigate, such anthropogenic effects.

The Baltic Sea, as both a low salinity and a relatively new habitat offers a particularly good resource for such research. Spatial environmental gradients offer a good opportunity to investigate adaptive potential through population comparisons.

I am particularly interested in population level variability to environmental stressors, either through genetic differences (local adaptation) or plasticity. Stress resistant populations provide insight into physiological coping mechanisms, and in themselves may provide genetic biodiversity refugia.

Related Publications

  • Wood HL, Nylund G, Eriksson SP. (2014) Physiological plasticity is key to the presence of the isopod Idotea baltica (Pallas) in the Baltic Sea. J.Sea Res. 85: 255-262
  • Nylund, G. M., R. T. Pereyra, H. L. Wood, K. Johannesson, and H. Pavia. 2012. Increased resistance towards generalist herbivory in the new range of a habitat-forming seaweed. Ecosphere 3(12):125- 137

Latest publications

The effect of environmental stressors on the early development of the Norway lobster Nephrops norvegicus (L.).
Hannah L. Wood, Susanne P. Eriksson, Mikaela Nordborg, Hannah K Styf
Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, Journal article 2015
Journal article

Ocean warming and acidification; implications for the Arctic brittlestar Ophiocten sericeum
Hannah L. Wood, J. I. Spicer, M. A. Kendall, D. M. Lowe, S. Widdicombe
Polar Biology, Journal article 2011
Journal article

Showing 1 - 10 of 12

2016

2015

The effect of environmental stressors on the early development of the Norway lobster Nephrops norvegicus (L.).
Hannah L. Wood, Susanne P. Eriksson, Mikaela Nordborg, Hannah K Styf
Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, Journal article 2015
Journal article

2014

2012

2011

Ocean warming and acidification; implications for the Arctic brittlestar Ophiocten sericeum
Hannah L. Wood, J. I. Spicer, M. A. Kendall, D. M. Lowe, S. Widdicombe
Polar Biology, Journal article 2011
Journal article

2010

2009

Showing 1 - 10 of 12

Page Manager: Sven Toresson|Last update: 9/15/2016
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